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at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt ablocksblockbustermega deals buo medium companies, why is that. >> to do a step out deal therehe sense that things are good. m & a needs to be done. growth is thro slow and one of e ways to rise is to buy. everything is good but we have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech could be an air yeah wirarea. what kind of gived guidelines can you give to investors so they can take advantage of these trends. >> there is a huge boom inenergd healthcarhealthcare in
welcome. i'm bob abernethy, and this is our annual look back at the top religion and ethics news of the year. religion and ethics managing editor kim lawton is here, and so are kevin eckstrom, editor in chief of religion news service, and e.j. dionne, senior fellow at the brookings institution, professor at georgetown university and columnist for "the washington post." welcome to you all. kim has put together a short video reminder of what happened in 2012. >> a wave of mass shootings renewed age-old theological discussions about evil, suffering and tragedy. especially after the massacre at the connecticut elementary school, many religious leaders repeated calls for stricter gun control measures. some called it a pro-life issue. one of the mass shootings took place in a house of worship. in august, six people were killed when a gunman opened fire at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. once again, religion played an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from
room safety and efficiency. erika miller, "n.b.r.," manhasset, new york. >> bob baur is the chief global economist at principle global investors, with $275 billion on management. bob, the higher productive numbers, will that lead to more hiring, regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff? >> i think it will. we have said for some time that businesses have pushed productivity as far as they can. if we continue at a modest, 2.5% growth rate, that will be enough that businesses will be forced to higher at a faster pace. >> tom: but we're not hearing a lot of confidence coming from the business community. we're seeing it in housing and automotive sales, but in terms of hiring, it is languishing. why do you think that difference exists? >> i think business is looking ahead. there is a real dichotomy, as you mentioned, between businesses and costumers. businesses are looking ahead, and they're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already taking action today to try to prepare for that e
holman updates the state of the negotiations and we talk with tennessee republican senator bob corker. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big jo
and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the economy to grow a bit. >> susie: what if there isn't a deal? does that mean there is going to be a sell-off or a correction in the markets? >> i think the hype in the recent days that a deal is coming is certainly responsible for the rally. i think if there is no deal, and the probabilities of that have gone down, thankfully, but if there is no deal, i still think we're not going to go off some nasty cliff that peop
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entit
with the helicopter and bob gates said to me boy when he saw that. because he was down at the heart of it and he remembered that. he says, you know, is this -- >> he had actually part of why he was in favor of the bomb as opposed to the helicopter raid. he was afraid of that. >> rose: here's the professionalism again. they said mission continues. there was not a moment that they didn't say. they may have considered it but they were so professional and so well trained that they knew the mission was still open to success. >> well it hadn't been, it was a hard landing, so there were no casualties, and i think the guys got shook up pretty good. but ... like you said, they do assaults every night. >> rose: the two of you when you were making this movie look at each other and say we're making a movie about one of the great stories of our time. >> i don't think we'll get another one this good. >> kind of the story of a lifetime. >> the whole time. >> rose: this is the story of a lifetime and we've been given this opportunity because we were prepared to do it and we had the right combination of skill
: this is from a wonderful piece bob simon did for 60 minutes showing you conducting a youth orchestra in la. >> uh-huh. >> rose: during a practice. here it is. >> on saturdays all the kids get together in an orchestra. today we were there, so was gustavo, who has been conducting youth orchestras back in venezuela since he was 13 and has his own way to get musicians to understand the music. >> what do you want to play first? >> ah, okay. one, and -- no, no, no, tempo, together. la, la, la. la, la, la. it is like a man talking to a girl, you know. la, la, la re fa. >> do re mi. >> maybe. okay. none of these kids knew anything about classical music before they came here. but gustavo knows that the program does a lot more than teach music, it builds character, discipline and teamwork. and he keeps kids off the streets. >> it is how we started, i remember this overture, would play, you know, i play as a child, and it is amazing, because to see the transformation of these children, not because of the rehearsal, it is because the power of music, how it can change the life, and what you cannot se
money. what financial advisors are saying about gold, and a conversation with b.e.t.'s bob johnson. all that, and more, on this edition of "the truth about money."
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9